Journals of Yesteryear

Amish and Mennonite Communities

Author: Ann Shank, former Sarasota County Historian
Source: Sarasota County History Center
Photo Credit: Sarasota County History Center

Newcomers to Sarasota are often surprised to find a substantial Amish and Mennonite community in Sarasota. The historical core of this community is south of Bahia Vista Street and west of Phillippi Creek. An explanation for the small lots in the original section lies in the earliest subdivision recorded for that parcel, the Sarasota National Tourist Camp.

Laid out in early 1925, the camp included 454 lots that each measured 40 by 40 feet. The following year Earl S. and Mary K. Craft platted Pinecraft. They added lots east and west of Phillippi Creek, to cover the area now between Lockwood Ridge Road and Kaufman Avenue. They reserved land along the creek for a park and noted the location for a community house and water tank. The lots that had been drawn for the Tourist Camp remained the same size; those west of the creek were larger.

In 1926, First National Company of Sarasota laid out the neighboring subdivision of Homecroft. It covered the land between the Tourist Camp and Beneva Road, from (now) Hacienda to Schrock Street. The Pinecraft name is used informally for the general area in which these subdivisions are located.

The earliest Amish and Mennonite visitors to this area were attracted not only by the weather, a welcome change from winters in Ohio and Pennsylvania, but also by the opportunities offered for winter farming. The first families of record, according to a history by Mrs. Myron Yoder, grew vegetables on land in the Palmer Farms, which were in Fruitville. A few families purchased land and became permanent residents; many farmed during the summer in the north and in Sarasota during the winter.

Not until 1945 was there a year-round permanent church within this religious community. By the early 1930s, the winter population had grown too large for worshiping in members homes. Amish and Mennonites together used the Tatum Ridge School until 1936 when a storm blew it off its foundation. The old Fruitville School became the next location for Sunday school and worship until the 1944 hurricane damaged it. A group of Mennonite residents organized a permanent church in 1945 and were given five lots along Bay Shore Road. Volunteers from the community and from the Civilian Public Service Camp (an alternative to military service for pacifists) in Mulberry provided most of the labor to build the first Bayshore Mennonite Church structure.

In Pinecraft itself, religious services were held at times outdoors, for a couple of years in a former Presbyterian chapel, and finally in a former bakery on the south side of Bahia Vista. This congregation is often called the Tourist Church. Another congregation formed the Tuttle Avenue Mennonite Church in the 1950s.

A small business district gradually emerged on Bahia Vista. The Pinecraft Elementary School met in former Sarasota Army Air Base barracks that had been moved to land just east of Beneva Avenue. The Pinecraft EatíN House, Pinecraft Hardware, Pinecraft IGA Grocery (pictured), and the Pinecraft branch of the U.S. Post Office were operated by and served the seasonal and year-round residents of the area. While Amish and Mennonite restaurants and churches have spread into the county, Pinecraft is still considered the heart of this special community.

Rate This Article

Total Votes: 9 Avg Vote: 5

Comments

Thank you for your comments!

You must be logged in to leave a comment.

advertisement

Sarasota County History and Preservation Organizations

 

Get Our Free Weekly Newsletter

sign up

Featured Journals

Park Day is November 6th

Unless some very modest community has beat us to it and then neglected to let the world know of its achievement, Sarasota is to have the first homemade people’s park. The idea of extending the present popular road-building day plan to secure the improvement of a tract of land for a park purposed by James E. Moore, has been seized upon with avidity and unanimity. In another column will be found Mayor Higel’s official contribution, in the shape of a proclamation setting aside Thursday, November 6, as Park Day, with the purpose in view of making this an annual event in Sarasota’s history.

Read More »
Sarasota High School - Rudolph Addition

The Modern Movement/International Style


The modern movement began in Europe and gradually influenced American architects. European architects, including Mies van der Rhoe experimented with plasticity – exploiting new materials and the latest technological advances, especially the steel frame. Design emphasis was on utility and function, rather than ornament. With the Nazi party’s rise to power in Germany and the onset of World War II, several modern architectural designers immigrated to the United States, bringing with them their structural and theoretical concepts.

Read More »
Sarasota Times Used Poetic Terms to Detail Resident's Deaths

The antiseptic tone of today’s obituaries is a far cry from the finely crafted, inspirational prose that documented the deaths of Sarasota’s early residents.

Read More »
close
User ID :
Password :
Log In

Wrong user name or password!